Diverticulitis – Latest Research

Probiotics – I wonder if taking these might help?

http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/tc/probiotics-topic-overview

Diverticulitis slideshow – Webmd.
http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/ss/slideshow-diverticulitis-overview

Food Notes – what might set it off?

Endomethacin – anti-inflammatory – might help short-term.

Latest Research

If you read most of the literature available about diverticulitis, they tell you to eat a diet high in fiber. The latest study says that’s all wrong. “Jan. 23, 2012 — A new study challenges the long-held belief that a high-fiber diet prevents the formation of small pouches in the colon wall that can lead to diverticular disease.”
http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/news/20120123/fiber-may-not-prevent-diverticular-disease

http://download.journals.elsevierhealth.com/pdfs/journals/0016-5085/PIIS0016508511602497.pdf

Use of Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Increases Risk
for Diverticulitis and Diverticular Bleeding
http://download.journals.elsevierhealth.com/pdfs/journals/0016-5085/PIIS0016508511001405.pdf

Diverticulitis diet – Mayo Clinic
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diverticulitis-diet/my00736

New Research
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videos/news/fiber_032212.html

Nuts, Seeds and Popcorn
http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/300/8/907.full

Antibiotics in Acute Uncomplicated Diverticulitis
http://www.bjs.co.uk/details/article/1455833/Randomized-clinical-trial-of-antibiotics-in-acute-uncomplicated-diverticulitis.html

Wikipedia

Most cases of simple, uncomplicated diverticulitis respond to conservative therapy with bowel rest and antibiotics.[7] The evidence for antibiotics however in mild cases is poor.[8] However, recurring acute attacks or complications, such as peritonitis, abscess, or fistula may require surgery, either immediately or on an elective basis.

People may be placed on a low residue diet.[9] This low-fiber diet gives the colon adequate time to heal without needing to be overworked. Later, patients are placed on a high-fiber diet.

Foods such as seeds, nuts, and corn were, in the past, thought by many health care professionals to possibly aggravate diverticulitis.[3] However, recent studies have found no evidence that suggests the avoidance of nuts and seeds prevents the progression of diverticulosis to an acute case of diverticulitis.[4] Not only has this research shown that they do not appear to be aggravating the diverticulitis, but it appears that a higher intake of nuts and corn could in fact help to avoid diverticulitis in male adults

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About Tom Terrific

Interested in MANY things.

Posted on February 15, 2012, in Health. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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